This week’s Lovely Science News (7)

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This week science sections provide some intriguing insights into health issues. From the development of drugs to cost-free treatment, if you’re lucky. And why you don’t have to see a face to recognize it.

Why do we still use mouse models? You just cannot easily translate findings from mouse tissues to the human organism. Still, we would hardly know anything about human genome if we hadn’t them. (Washington Post, Speaking of Science)

Why do blind people recognize faces – without touching them? An experiment at Georgetown University trained people who were blind from birth to use a face scanner that works with sound. You can listen to it (and actually watch it) here. (NPR Shots)

Why it needs a lottery to fill the gaps of the US health care system. This local news story from Arlington, USA, provides you with the basics of US health insurance. Those who don’t have them need a lottery to get treatment, like in Arlington. (Washington Post, Local)

This week’s Lovely Science News (5)

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This week’s Lovely Science News is all about everyday human mysteries. From happiness at age to handedness to gold-coated capsules. Here’s why you should read them.

Why are so few people left-handed? Spoiler-Alert: We don’t know. Still, Joe Hanson offers some interesting theories about it. Watch the video! It does not hold the solution, but for sure will make you a little smarter. (Washington Post, Speaking of Science)

Why aging can make you happy. Everyone knows someone who might be in his mid-life crisis. Researchers have shown statistic proof for that some time ago. But if your psychological well-being curve recovers or further decreases depends very much on where you live. (The Atlantic)

Why swallow a gold-coated capsule? Because doctors advised their patients to do so some time ago. In early october researchers found out that pills are best to look like something you wouldn’t want to swallow neither: a spiny blowfish. (The Atlantic)