This week’s Lovely Science News (6)

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page

This weeks‘ Lovely Science News come up with movies, dancing and, er, jellyfish. Here’s why you should read them.

Why some just can’t dance to the beat. This dysfunction even has its own name: beat deafness. And it says a lot about your inner timing mechanisms. Nice extra: Scientists‘ recommendations on the best dance moves. (The Washington Post To Your Health)

Why jellyfish is tastier than we thought (at least for other animals). If you are at the beach you most probably think they serve for nothing – and so did other animals on the ground of the sea, researchers thought. Instead, a cool video from underwater shows that dead jellyfish seems to be a delicates like every other fish corpse. (The New York Times Science)

Why do Science Fiction movies get awarded so rarely? The simple answer: Because most of the scripts are crap. Walt Hickey dives deep into the data of handed-in scripts and finds out what actually works for screenplay writers. If you want to make money, try it with horror porn, I mean, „sexual graphic thrillers“. (Five Thirty Eight)

This week’s Lovely Science News (5)

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page

This week’s Lovely Science News is all about everyday human mysteries. From happiness at age to handedness to gold-coated capsules. Here’s why you should read them.

Why are so few people left-handed? Spoiler-Alert: We don’t know. Still, Joe Hanson offers some interesting theories about it. Watch the video! It does not hold the solution, but for sure will make you a little smarter. (Washington Post, Speaking of Science)

Why aging can make you happy. Everyone knows someone who might be in his mid-life crisis. Researchers have shown statistic proof for that some time ago. But if your psychological well-being curve recovers or further decreases depends very much on where you live. (The Atlantic)

Why swallow a gold-coated capsule? Because doctors advised their patients to do so some time ago. In early october researchers found out that pills are best to look like something you wouldn’t want to swallow neither: a spiny blowfish. (The Atlantic)

This week’s Lovely Science News (4)

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page

This week holds the best topics in science news: Spaceships, volcanoes and magic. Here’s why they’re worth reading.

Why we believe in magic: Magic is that wonderful thing you were told, you had to lose faith in to become a grown-up. Even though most adults would deny, everyone still believes in it. It can make yourself want to stab a voodoo doll of your partner. (NYTimes)

Students lost a lot in the Antares Rocket Explosion: From little pea shoots to mini-satellites, a third of the loading at the Cygnus spacecraft consisted of science projects. Just in case you didn’t notice: It all went up in a huge fireball. Look at the experts in this story. They basically say: Hm, daily business. (Wired)

Watch a volcano grow: Did you ever wonder what it looks like if a volcano grows from under the sea. Check out the example of Hawaii. No difficult explanations, just pictures. Lovely. (Wired Science)

This week’s Lovely Science News (3)

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page

Wrong, wrong and right. This week’s Lovely Science News deals with problems and success. Here’s why you should read these stories.

Why is gas undermining climate protection efforts? You probably do not notice it, but in your city’s gas transportation system might be thousands of small leaks. That is not particularly dangerous for you. It still damages the environment – and it’s you who pays for this. (538.com Science)

Why are most financial economists wrong? You thought you had your investment strategy scientifically backed up? I bet you don’t, really. At least, the studies it might be based upon are probably wrong. Ironically, that’s the result of a new study. (Vox.com)

Why are there no new Ebola cases in Nigeria? Well, that is a glimpse of hope in a depressing row of public health news from (West) Africa. Step by step: What really helps against Ebola? One of the most populated countries on Earth shows how to successfully deal with it. (Video from Time.com)

This week’s extra: An honestly unbelievable story on the origins of the pill. It’s got to do with a catholic doctor. (Vox.com)

WHO: „Die Tabakindustrie schlägt zurück – härter und auf jedem Kanal“

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page
Where there's a habit...

Credit: Just Ard, Flickr

Die Mitgliedstaaten der Weltgesundheitsorganisation (WHO) haben in Moskau über weitere Schritte zur Tabakregulierung verhandelt – und beklagen heftige Gegenwehr der Konzerne. „Während die Durchsetzung der Rahmenkonvention weiter fortschreitet, schlägt die Tabakindustrie zurück – härter und auf jedem möglichen Kanal, egal wie hinterhältig diese Kanäle und Praktiken seien“, sagte die Generaldirektorin der WHO Margaret Chan in ihrer Eröffnungsrede.

Bei den Verhandlungen in der vergangenen Woche ging es unter anderem um E-Zigaretten. Laut WHO werden viele der einst unabhängigen Hersteller heute von multinationalen Tabakfirmen kontrolliert. Wie die Unternehmen um die Anerkennung der E-Zigarette kämpft, hat mir Martina Pötschke-Langer vom Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) erklärt (Spiegel Online).

Die Mitgliedstaaten haben ungeachtet dessen entschieden, E-Zigaretten ähnlich stark zu regulieren wie Tabakzigaretten, teilte die WHO in ihrer Pressemitteilung mit. Die Entscheidung verpflichtet die Staaten, darunter Deutschland, allerdings nicht Maßnahmen zu ergreifen.

Laut einer aktuellen Umfrage des DKFZ probieren vor allem Jugendliche die E-Zigarette aus (Spiegel Online). Das beliebteste Mittel für einen Rauchstopp bleibt hingegen der kalte Entzug.

This week’s lovely science news (2)

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page

Again, I browsed my favourite science news sites this week and found some great pieces about science, life and life science. Here’s why you should read them.

Why do I always wait in the slowest lane? Mona Chalabi’s „Hope the numbers help“ deals with an everyday problem. Which lane to choose at the grocery check-out. Sounds trivial, but it’s not. There is actually science behind all this. (538.com)

Why have a huge wedding? Well, it could save your marriage – if it is cheap. Two researchers at Emory University, USA, analyzed what improves your chances of staying together. Even though you might get bored of all the charts in this article (you won’t), read the last paragraph and follow the instructions! (The Atlantic, National)

Why do researchers try to delete memories? You think Men in Black was all Science Fiction? Think again. „Inside laboratories, memory researchers are doing crazy things to the brains of mice and rats“, the first line says. So far, they are working on rodents. But one day it could help us understand Alzheimer’s and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) better. (Vox.com)

This week’s Lovely Science News

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page

This weeks‘ science sections come up with a whole bunch of good reads. Here’s why you should read them.

Why a ring on orbit? Put 19 professors in a room and in ten weeks time they develop an off-Earth colony. Amazing pictures! By the way, that was 1975 (The Atlantic Tech).

Why talking to the mirror? It could help you reflect your mind’s view on your body. Or possibly cure anorexia. Depends on whom you ask (NPR shots).

Why giraffes? One in two giraffe kids dies! Their mothers mourn for days. Oh, and they are nearly invisible. Listen to the podcast! (NYTimes Science)

Arzneiverordnungsreport 2014: Pharma-Hersteller und Krankenkassen streiten um Interpretation von Pillenpreisen

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page

Seit 30 Jahren kritisieren Krankenkassen mit ihrem Arzneiverordnungsreport die Preispolitik der Pillenhersteller. Der Vorwurf: Medikamente seien hierzulande viel zu teuer. Alles Quatsch, sagt die Pharmalobby, die Kalkulationen stimmen nicht. Wer hat sich verrechnet?“

Epic line on deputy nurse matron in Kenema hospital, Josephine Finda Sellu, in Ebola plagued Sierra Leone:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page

„In the campaign against the Ebola virus, which is sweeping across parts of West Africa in an epidemic worse than all previous outbreaks of the disease combined, the front line is stitched together by people like Ms. Sellu: doctors and nurses  who risk their lives to treat patients who will probably die.“

in The New York Times supplement to Süddeutsche Zeitung, 9/5/14

Praktikum bei Spiegel Online

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page

UPDATE 1.9.2014: Wer über meine Meldungen, Berichte und Hintergrundstücke auf dem Laufenden bleiben will, findet sie hier.

Seit Montag bin ich Praktikant im Ressort Wissenschaft bei Spiegel Online. Hier meine erste Meldung – Hightech-Material: Folie ändert Farbe bei Helligkeit – über eine hauchdünne Folie, die bei Lichteinstrahlung durchsichtig wird. Bis sie zum Einsatz kommt, wird es noch eine Weile dauern. Mögliche Anwendungsgebiete reichen laut der Forscher von Militär bis Mode.

Mein Praktikum dauert noch bis zum 10. Oktober.