Update – My Recent Projects

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Dear all, it’s been a while since my last posting. Here’s what I did so far.

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Well, not entirely. I did an internship at the investigative unit of Die Welt. Find their blog here (in German language). Besides, I finished my studies at journalism school and took some time off.

After that I started a two months investigative research project at CORRECT!V. It’s actually a data fellowship focussed on the quality of hospital care. My data sources are the ‚hospital quality reports‘. What I do is basically this (in a slightly more electronic way).

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Werkstattbericht: Recherche zur Innovative Medicines Initiative

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Seit September habe ich mit Spiegel Online, dem Daten-Team des Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen (SRF) und der belgischen Tageszeitung De Standaard zur Innovative Medicines Initiative recherchiert.

Herausgekommen ist ein Dossier auf Spiegel Online: Bürger zahlen, Konzerne profitieren

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This week’s Lovely Science News (7)

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This week science sections provide some intriguing insights into health issues. From the development of drugs to cost-free treatment, if you’re lucky. And why you don’t have to see a face to recognize it.

Why do we still use mouse models? You just cannot easily translate findings from mouse tissues to the human organism. Still, we would hardly know anything about human genome if we hadn’t them. (Washington Post, Speaking of Science)

Why do blind people recognize faces – without touching them? An experiment at Georgetown University trained people who were blind from birth to use a face scanner that works with sound. You can listen to it (and actually watch it) here. (NPR Shots)

Why it needs a lottery to fill the gaps of the US health care system. This local news story from Arlington, USA, provides you with the basics of US health insurance. Those who don’t have them need a lottery to get treatment, like in Arlington. (Washington Post, Local)

This week’s Lovely Science News (6)

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This weeks‘ Lovely Science News come up with movies, dancing and, er, jellyfish. Here’s why you should read them.

Why some just can’t dance to the beat. This dysfunction even has its own name: beat deafness. And it says a lot about your inner timing mechanisms. Nice extra: Scientists‘ recommendations on the best dance moves. (The Washington Post To Your Health)

Why jellyfish is tastier than we thought (at least for other animals). If you are at the beach you most probably think they serve for nothing – and so did other animals on the ground of the sea, researchers thought. Instead, a cool video from underwater shows that dead jellyfish seems to be a delicates like every other fish corpse. (The New York Times Science)

Why do Science Fiction movies get awarded so rarely? The simple answer: Because most of the scripts are crap. Walt Hickey dives deep into the data of handed-in scripts and finds out what actually works for screenplay writers. If you want to make money, try it with horror porn, I mean, „sexual graphic thrillers“. (Five Thirty Eight)

This week’s Lovely Science News (5)

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This week’s Lovely Science News is all about everyday human mysteries. From happiness at age to handedness to gold-coated capsules. Here’s why you should read them.

Why are so few people left-handed? Spoiler-Alert: We don’t know. Still, Joe Hanson offers some interesting theories about it. Watch the video! It does not hold the solution, but for sure will make you a little smarter. (Washington Post, Speaking of Science)

Why aging can make you happy. Everyone knows someone who might be in his mid-life crisis. Researchers have shown statistic proof for that some time ago. But if your psychological well-being curve recovers or further decreases depends very much on where you live. (The Atlantic)

Why swallow a gold-coated capsule? Because doctors advised their patients to do so some time ago. In early october researchers found out that pills are best to look like something you wouldn’t want to swallow neither: a spiny blowfish. (The Atlantic)

This week’s Lovely Science News (4)

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This week holds the best topics in science news: Spaceships, volcanoes and magic. Here’s why they’re worth reading.

Why we believe in magic: Magic is that wonderful thing you were told, you had to lose faith in to become a grown-up. Even though most adults would deny, everyone still believes in it. It can make yourself want to stab a voodoo doll of your partner. (NYTimes)

Students lost a lot in the Antares Rocket Explosion: From little pea shoots to mini-satellites, a third of the loading at the Cygnus spacecraft consisted of science projects. Just in case you didn’t notice: It all went up in a huge fireball. Look at the experts in this story. They basically say: Hm, daily business. (Wired)

Watch a volcano grow: Did you ever wonder what it looks like if a volcano grows from under the sea. Check out the example of Hawaii. No difficult explanations, just pictures. Lovely. (Wired Science)

This week’s Lovely Science News (3)

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Wrong, wrong and right. This week’s Lovely Science News deals with problems and success. Here’s why you should read these stories.

Why is gas undermining climate protection efforts? You probably do not notice it, but in your city’s gas transportation system might be thousands of small leaks. That is not particularly dangerous for you. It still damages the environment – and it’s you who pays for this. (538.com Science)

Why are most financial economists wrong? You thought you had your investment strategy scientifically backed up? I bet you don’t, really. At least, the studies it might be based upon are probably wrong. Ironically, that’s the result of a new study. (Vox.com)

Why are there no new Ebola cases in Nigeria? Well, that is a glimpse of hope in a depressing row of public health news from (West) Africa. Step by step: What really helps against Ebola? One of the most populated countries on Earth shows how to successfully deal with it. (Video from Time.com)

This week’s extra: An honestly unbelievable story on the origins of the pill. It’s got to do with a catholic doctor. (Vox.com)

This week’s lovely science news (2)

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Again, I browsed my favourite science news sites this week and found some great pieces about science, life and life science. Here’s why you should read them.

Why do I always wait in the slowest lane? Mona Chalabi’s „Hope the numbers help“ deals with an everyday problem. Which lane to choose at the grocery check-out. Sounds trivial, but it’s not. There is actually science behind all this. (538.com)

Why have a huge wedding? Well, it could save your marriage – if it is cheap. Two researchers at Emory University, USA, analyzed what improves your chances of staying together. Even though you might get bored of all the charts in this article (you won’t), read the last paragraph and follow the instructions! (The Atlantic, National)

Why do researchers try to delete memories? You think Men in Black was all Science Fiction? Think again. „Inside laboratories, memory researchers are doing crazy things to the brains of mice and rats“, the first line says. So far, they are working on rodents. But one day it could help us understand Alzheimer’s and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) better. (Vox.com)

This week’s Lovely Science News

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This weeks‘ science sections come up with a whole bunch of good reads. Here’s why you should read them.

Why a ring on orbit? Put 19 professors in a room and in ten weeks time they develop an off-Earth colony. Amazing pictures! By the way, that was 1975 (The Atlantic Tech).

Why talking to the mirror? It could help you reflect your mind’s view on your body. Or possibly cure anorexia. Depends on whom you ask (NPR shots).

Why giraffes? One in two giraffe kids dies! Their mothers mourn for days. Oh, and they are nearly invisible. Listen to the podcast! (NYTimes Science)